Quick Answer: How Did The Voting Rights Act Affect The Number Of Black Voters?

How did the Voting Rights Act affect the number of black voters quizlet?

From #1, what was one provision of the Civil Rights Act of 1964? From #8, how did the Voting Rights Act affect the number of black voters? The number increased to 3.1 million. You just studied 2 terms!

How did the Voting Rights Act of 1965 help black voters?

It outlawed the discriminatory voting practices adopted in many southern states after the Civil War, including literacy tests as a prerequisite to voting. This “act to enforce the fifteenth amendment to the Constitution” was signed into law 95 years after the amendment was ratified.

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How did the Voting Rights Act of 1965 Effect voter registration?

The legislation outlawed literacy tests and provided for the appointment of Federal examiners (with the power to register qualified citizens to vote) in certain jurisdictions with a history of voting discrimination.

How was African American voter registration affected by the Voting Rights Act of 1965 quizlet?

How did the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 affect voter registration rates in the United States in the decades that followed? African American voter registration rates equaled white registration rates.

What did the Civil Rights Act of 1960 do to help enforce voting rights?

The Civil Rights Act of 1960 was intended to strengthen voting rights and expand the enforcement powers of the Civil Rights Act of 1957. It included provisions for federal inspection of local voter registration rolls and authorized court-appointed referees to help African Americans register and vote.

What did the Voting Rights Act aim to do quizlet?

aimed to overcome legal barriers at the state and local levels that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote under the 15th Amendment to the Constitution of the United States.

Who did the Voting Rights Act of 1965 Effect?

The law had an immediate impact. By the end of 1965, a quarter of a million new black voters had been registered, one-third by Federal examiners. By the end of 1966, only 4 out of the 13 southern states had fewer than 50 percent of African Americans registered to vote.

Who voted against the Voting Rights Act of 1965?

This amendment overwhelmingly failed, with 42 Democrats and 22 Republicans voting against it.

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Who passed the Voting Rights Act of 1965?

President Johnson signed the resulting legislation into law on August 6, 1965. Section 2 of the Act, which closely followed the language of the 15th amendment, applied a nationwide prohibition against the denial or abridgment of the right to vote on the literacy tests on a nationwide basis.

How did the Voting Rights Act of 1965 stop discrimination in areas where voter eligibility?

How did the Voting Rights Act of 1965 stop discrimination in areas where voter eligibility tests were previously used? It required federal supervision. it raised awareness of civil rights through TV coverage.

How did the ratio of voter registration rates change between African Americans and whites as a result of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 African American?

How did the ratio of voter registration rates change between African Americans and whites as a result of the Voting Rights Act of 1965? African American voter registration rates equaled white registration rates. African American voter registration rates became lower than white registration rates.

What effect did the Voting Rights Act have on African American voter registration in the South quizlet?

Terms in this set (9) as African American registration increased, the number of African Americans elected increased. George Wallace.

What happened as a result of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 quizlet?

This act made racial, religious, and sex discrimination by employers illegal and gave the government the power to enforce all laws governing civil rights, including desegregation of schools and public places. You just studied 9 terms!

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