What Did The Voting Rights Act Of 1965 Enable Federal Officials To Do?

What did the Voting Rights Act of 1965 accomplish quizlet?

This act made racial, religious, and sex discrimination by employers illegal and gave the government the power to enforce all laws governing civil rights, including desegregation of schools and public places.

Why the federal government passed the Voting Rights Act?

Designed to enforce the voting rights guaranteed by the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments to the United States Constitution, the Act sought to secure the right to vote for racial minorities throughout the country, especially in the South.

How did the Voting Rights Act of 1965 impact society?

The law had an immediate impact. By the end of 1965, a quarter of a million new black voters had been registered, one-third by Federal examiners. By the end of 1966, only 4 out of the 13 southern states had fewer than 50 percent of African Americans registered to vote.

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Why was the Voting Rights Act necessary?

Congress passed the Voting Rights Act of 1965 which aimed to increase the number of people registered to vote in areas where there was a record of previous discrimination.

What difference did the Voting Rights Act make in black voter participation?

The 1965 Voting Rights Act created a significant change in the status of African Americans throughout the South. The Voting Rights Act prohibited the states from using literacy tests and other methods of excluding African Americans from voting.

What did the Voting Rights Act end quizlet?

It ended gender discrimination. It ended public segregation. When was the Fifteenth Amendment ratified? Before the Fifteenth Amendment was passed, which states refused African-Americans the right to vote?

When did black men get to vote?

Most black men in the United States did not gain the right to vote until after the American Civil War. In 1870, the 15th Amendment was ratified to prohibit states from denying a male citizen the right to vote based on “race, color or previous condition of servitude.”

Who passed the Voting Rights Act of 1965?

President Johnson signed the resulting legislation into law on August 6, 1965. Section 2 of the Act, which closely followed the language of the 15th amendment, applied a nationwide prohibition against the denial or abridgment of the right to vote on the literacy tests on a nationwide basis.

How did the Voting Rights Act of 1965 stop discrimination in areas where voter eligibility?

How did the Voting Rights Act of 1965 stop discrimination in areas where voter eligibility tests were previously used? It required federal supervision. it raised awareness of civil rights through TV coverage.

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When was the Voting Rights Act overturned?

On June 25, 2013, the United States Supreme Court held that it is unconstitutional to use the coverage formula in Section 4(b) of the Voting Rights Act to determine which jurisdictions are subject to the preclearance requirement of Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act, Shelby County v. Holder, 133 S. Ct. 2612 (2013).

Was the Voting Rights Act unconstitutional?

Section 4(b) of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 is unconstitutional. Shelby County v. A 2020 study found that jurisdictions that had previously been covered by preclearance substantially increased their voter registration purges after the Shelby decision.

What was Section 4 of the Voting Rights Act?

When Congress enacted the Voting Rights Act of 1965, it determined that racial discrimination in voting had been more prevalent in certain areas of the country. Section 4(a) of the Act established a formula to identify those areas and to provide for more stringent remedies where appropriate.

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